Benzodiazepines



Benzodiazepines No Dementia Risk?

6/21/2015
05:21 | Author: Ryan Bosworth
Benzodiazepines
Benzodiazepines No Dementia Risk?

Contrary to previous research, a new study suggests that benzodiazepines do not to raise the risk for dementia. However, experts caution that.

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Deaths from Benzodiazepines Are Increasing

5/20/2015
04:31 | Author: Ryan Atcheson
Benzodiazepines
Deaths from Benzodiazepines Are Increasing

The rate of deaths from overdoses of benzodiazepines has increased five-fold, researchers say.

Prescription opioids have made headlines for skyrocketing rates of deaths from overdoses, but a new report shows that overdose deaths from another group of medications — sedatives called benzodiazepines — are also increasing.

The researchers found that the death rate in the U.S. from overdoses on benzodiazepines has increased more than fivefold since 1996. Also known as "benzos," the class includes drugs such as Valium and Xanax. The medicines are sometimes used in combination with opioids to treat people with chronic pain.

Overdoses involving benzodiazepines are "a public health problem that has gone under the radar," Dr.

Benzodiazepines definition of Benzodiazepines by Medical dictionary

4/19/2015
03:41 | Author: Caleb Lawman
Benzodiazepines
Benzodiazepines definition of Benzodiazepines by Medical dictionary

Benzodiazepines are medicines that help relieve nervousness, tension, and other symptoms by slowing the central nervous system.

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Benzodiazepines Do Not Directly Increase Dementia Risk, Still Not

3/18/2015
02:51 | Author: Alexandra Barrington
Benzodiazepines
Benzodiazepines Do Not Directly Increase Dementia Risk, Still Not

Benzodiazepines are a common class of medication used for anxiety and sleep problems. New research finds that although the drugs do not.

Benzodiazepines are a common class of medication used for anxiety and sleep problems. New research finds that although the drugs do not increase the risk of dementia, health professionals are advised to avoid their use in older adults.

Common benzodiazepines are clonazepam (Klonopin), lorazepam (Ativan), diazepam (Valium), and alprazolam (Xanax).

Although research published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) did not find a cause and effect increased dementia risk, the use of benzodiazepines among older adults may lead to adverse health outcomes.

Benzodiazepines are widely prescribed among older adults to manage sleep, anxiety, and depressive disorders.

Benzodiazepine Drugs Tied To Increased Risk of Dementia Psych

12/27/2015
11:39 | Author: Sarah Boolman
Benzodiazepines
Benzodiazepine Drugs Tied To Increased Risk of Dementia Psych

New research suggests the practice of using benzodiazepines to treat psychiatric conditions should be abandoned as evidence suggests the.

New research suggests the practice of using benzodiazepines to treat psychiatric conditions should be abandoned as evidence suggests the drugs heighten the risk for dementia and death.

Benzodiazepines include branded prescription drugs like Valium, Ativan, Klonopin, and Xanax. This class of drug received FDA approval in the 1960s and was believed to be a safer alternative to barbiturates.

Despite new psychiatric protocols, some physicians continue to prescribe benzodiazepines as a primary treatment for insomnia, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and other ailments.

“Current research is extremely clear and physicians need to partner with their patients to move them into therapies, like antidepressants, that are proven to be safer and more effective,” said Helene Alphonso, DO, a board-certified psychiatrist and Director of Osteopathic Medical Education at North Texas University Health Science Center.

“Due to a shortage of mental health professionals in rural and underserved areas, we see primary care physicians using this class of drugs to give relief to their patients with psychiatric symptoms.